The Eurogroup is an informal body where the ministers of the euro area member states discuss matters relating to their shared responsibilities related to the euro. 

Tasks

Its main task is to ensure close coordination of economic policies among the euro area member states. It also aims to promote conditions for stronger economic growth.

The Eurogroup is also responsible for preparing the Euro Summit meetings and for their follow-up.

Meetings

The Eurogroup usually meets once a month, on the eve of the Economic and Financial Affairs Council meeting. The commissioner for economic and financial affairs, taxation and customs and the president of the European Central Bank also participate in the Eurogroup meetings.

The first informal meeting of finance ministers of the euro area countries took place on 4 June 1998 at the Château de Senningen in Luxembourg.

President

The Eurogroup elects its president for a term of 2.5 years by a simple majority of votes. The incumbent president is Jeroen Dijsselbloem.  He was re-elected to the post for a second term on 13 July 2015. Jeroen Dijsselbloem is Minister for Finance of The Netherlands.

Work programme

The Eurogroup adopts its work programme every 6 months. The programme defines main areas of focus and sets preliminary agendas for the upcoming Eurogroup meetings.  

Joining the euro area

To be able to join the euro area the EU member states are required to fulfil the so-called 'convergence criteria'. These are economic and legal conditions agreed in the Maastricht Treaty in 1992 and are also known as 'Maastricht criteria'.

The final decision on a EU country's joining the euro area is taken by the Council of the EU, based on a proposal by the Commission and after the European Parliament has been consulted.

Joining the euro area

To be able to join the euro area the EU member states are required to fulfil the so-called 'convergence criteria'. These are economic and legal conditions agreed in the Maastricht Treaty in 1992 and are also known as 'Maastricht criteria'.

The final decision on a EU country's joining the euro area is taken by the Council of the EU, based on a proposal by the Commission and after the European Parliament has been consulted.