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Jeroen Dijsselbloem, President of the Eurogroup

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In the spotlight

Eurogroup meeting, 9 September 2016

The Eurogroup discussed the progress made by Greece in achieving the milestones agreed in the context of the first review of its financial assistance programme.

It also looked into how government spending reviews could help improve the quality of public finances in the euro area. The Eurogroup adopted a statement to that effect.

Ministers also touched upon current fiscal issues,  including the excessive deficit procedure for Portugal and Spain, and the ongoing work to simplify the implementation of the Stability and Growth Pact.

The Eurogroup met in Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia, the country currently holding the rotating presidency of the Council of the EU.

Jeroen Dijsselbloem speaks at the annual Bruegel dinner in Brussels

On Tuesday 6 September, Eurogroup President Jeroen Dijsselbloem spoke at the annual dinner organised by the 'Bruegel' - a European think tank specialising in economics. J. Dijsselbloem talked about countering populist trends and the current economic challenges in Europe.

About

Jeroen Dijsselbloem has been Eurogroup President since 21 January 2013. He was re-elected to the post for a second term on 13 July 2015.

J. Dijsselbloem is the second permanent Eurogroup President in the history of the Eurogroup. Jeroen Dijsselbloem is currently also Minister for Finance of The Netherlands

Since February 2013 he has also held the post of Chairperson of the board of governors of the European Stability Mechanism.

Mission statement

Finance ministers from the euro area countries meet every month in the Eurogroup to discuss issues that are of shared interest because they use a single currency. Over the next two years their discussions will focus on financial stability, sustainable growth and job creation.

In particular, developing the banking union will help to increase financial stability within the euro area. Investment by governments and companies will encourage economic activity and job creation. Ensuring sound and growth-friendly fiscal policy in line with the eurozone's rules (the Stability and Growth Pact) makes the euro area economy more stable.

We also need structural economic reform to unlock productive capacity, particularly in areas such as labour and product markets. 

Progress in all these areas will give everyone, especially young people, the chance to prosper, and will secure the European social model for the future.

Mission statement

Finance ministers from the euro area countries meet every month in the Eurogroup to discuss issues that are of shared interest because they use a single currency. Over the next two years their discussions will focus on financial stability, sustainable growth and job creation.

In particular, developing the banking union will help to increase financial stability within the euro area. Investment by governments and companies will encourage economic activity and job creation. Ensuring sound and growth-friendly fiscal policy in line with the eurozone's rules (the Stability and Growth Pact) makes the euro area economy more stable.

We also need structural economic reform to unlock productive capacity, particularly in areas such as labour and product markets. 

Progress in all these areas will give everyone, especially young people, the chance to prosper, and will secure the European social model for the future.